British Columbia will add programming to the list of school subjects.

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The authorities of British Columbia told about their intentions to add programming to the school curriculum, mentioning the constant lack of “brains” in one of the most stable areas of the Canadian economy technical and applied sciences. “All children, from preschool to graduate, will have the opportunity to master the basics of programming,” said Kristi Clark at the opening of the two-day provincial summit in Vancouver, dedicated to technical sciences.

Clark announced the innovation (which by that time has already managed to tell The Globe and Mail) as part of a broad program to support the technology sector in British Columbia. Last month, the authorities have already managed to talk about some aspects of the program, including the creation of 100 million venture capital funds to finance start-ups.  Canadian politicians are increasingly advocating a “digital” economy, since in recent years not enough attention has been paid to this area. They also believe that new, more effective approaches to introducing innovations and supporting the technology sector are needed, given that the economy is fluctuating, and a new class of start-ups is emerging, which is gaining momentum and undermining established types of industries.

“IT skills are critical, because technology is behind many future jobs,” said Jeff Booth, director of BuildDirect Technologies Inc., a web platform specializing in ordering building materials with a staff of 330 people. “At the moment there is already a war for technology talents, in which companies like us are looking for the best engineers around the world. Chances are high that programming will become an inherent skill, like reading and writing. Over the next three years, a new curriculum for programming in all classes will be introduced in British Columbia. It will include new standards for mathematics and other scientific subjects, as well as a new component of the school curriculum called “Applied skills, design and technology”. His goal is to improve students’ ability to solve problems and creative thinking.

The teaching methods will be changed in all classes, even in kindergartens, where changes in teaching will be made in order to develop the ability of applied science in children. As students grow up in British Columbia, they will experience “computerized” thinking, as well as various aspects of programming. According to the authorities, by the end of the 9th grade, students will have basic programming skills.  Canadian politicians are increasingly advocating a “digital” economy, since in recent years not enough attention has been paid to this area. They also believe that new, more effective approaches to introducing innovations and supporting the technology sector are needed, given that the economy is fluctuating, and a new class of start-ups is emerging, which is gaining momentum and undermining established types of industries.